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Reclaimed

A group exhibition curated by David Poppie

Works by Ursula Clark, Matt Evald Johnson, David Poppie, Andrew L. Redington, and Roger Sayre.
February 22nd - March 22nd, 2008

Gallery Hours: weekdays by appointment, weekends 1-6 pm
Gallery Contact: A.M. Richard (917) 570-1476

Reclaimed features five artists pre-occupied with the notion of recycling. The artists presented have roots in various disciplines, including photography, sculpture, painting and furniture design. Ursula Clark, Matt E. Johnson, Andrew L. Redington and Roger Sayre, were asked to conceive two and three-dimensional work from reclaimed objects and materials. The artist-used materials, the organic and the mass-produced, were culled from nature and modern life.

For the past few years, DAVID POPPIE has been working conceptually with objets trouvés. Mr. Poppie accumulates lost or disposable objects and gives them new significance as contemplative or utilitarian works of art. In the site-specific work, Sense Field , Mr. Poppie has created a futuristic window screen out of a collection of discarded (and unrecyclable) plastic compact-disc jewel cases. Stained-glass, a craft traditional tied to European medieval liturgical architecture –and just as significant as the language of music and light transmission is to spiritual meditation- has essentially been re-invented using disposable 20th century electronic appliance packaging. The work’s dimensions was determined by a window located in the gallery space. Mr. Poppie has created a luminous work of art that is pliant to a number of domestic and industrial environments. Mr. Poppie lives and works in Easthampton, MA.

URSULA CLARK, a Brooklyn-based artist, will be presenting Outcrop, a site-specific installation. Ms. Clark uses soil, moss, branches, twigs, leaves, rocks and pine cones to create an idealized natural environment. In this aspect she is reverting an architectural space to a bucolic landscape –one that may or may not have existed prior to the building’s construction.

The 18th century in Europe saw the emergence of a new type of furniture, referred to as metamorphic, for its distinctive characteristic of convertability. ANDREW L. REDINGTON creates metamorphic furniture from reclaimed materials such as industrial wood pallets, household goods and assorted plastics. Constructions of elevated containers may result in both tangible and impalpable forms i.e. a table or a light source. Mr. Redington lives and works in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

ROGER SAYRE has conceived a series of wall pieces assembled from discarded doors. Rescued from an urban dumpster, the doors were dismantled, cut in sections and reconfigured as visual abstractions. The result is a composition of surprising dynamism and confounding beauty. Mr. Sayre, as artist and curator, is the recipient of numerous grants. His work has been exhibited internationally. He lives and works in Jersey City.

In his recent sculptures, “bio-industrial abstractions”, MATT E. JOHNSON, questions the relationship between primary spatial dimensions. The artist pairs salvaged silverware with reclaimed industrial metal of various finish and composition. Panelized and distressed stainless steel, chrome and copper are layered in wave formations with heavily forged elements tightly bound with delicate utensils. Innate strength and homeostasis perspire from Mr. Johnson’s sculptural manifestations.

Press release